About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
washington the benefit of the doubt so far today. we've had no real progress to speak of on the fiscal cliff. the president did speak publicly about it today. but we haven't exactly taken any step backwards either on wall street as far as the major averages go. we have had more special dividends declared, which we'll get to. first, get you caught up on the markets. kind of a meandering day. a few economic bits of data out today. other than that, not a lot going on as far as economic data go. we're all just waiting to see that white puff of smoke come out of washington and nothing yet so far. the dow virtually unchanged right now at 12,966. the nasdaq is down seven points right now. we'll talk with seema mody about that. and the s&p 500 index at this hour is down 1.80 in change at 1407. in today's "closing bell" exchange, we go over what is going on as we head toward the end of the year. seema mody is at the nasdaq today. jeff, what do you make of what's going on in washington? i'm most interested in the fact that the markets have lost the volatili volatility. we're not seeing the markets res
of $300 billion. guys, it looks like the horse trading is alive and well here in washington. now this offer being extended from the republicans. you can assume that the white house will not think this is enough tax revenue to go forward, but, of course, offers are being exchanged here so that's a sign negotiations are under way, guys. >> let's get into the details here. $600 billion in health savings. what does that mean for medicare? break it down in terms of where these savings come from. >> i wish i could. what we don't have here is a lot of detail hanging off this christmas tree at this point. we're looking at a couple of bullet points being released now in terms of the scale of the deal. it gives us overall broad numbers. presumably negotiators would have to go in and fill in details of how they're get that kind of savings. there have been a lot of proposals on health of finding billions of dollars of savings by reducing overhead and other things like that. you've seen the unions come out and say they don't want to see any changes at all that would hurt payoffs to beneficiar
cliff, and what do you make of the recent complacency? is there a wall street/washington disconnect? >> interesting question. well, i certainly hope that markets won't have to tank. i don't -- we want to have confidence, not just in markets but in businesses and households as well, and the best way the fiscal policy-makers can achieve that is by coming to a solution as quickly as possible. markets have obviously already responded to some extent, up and down. can you see from day to day how they respond to news about the negotiations. but, on the other hand, it's also true, if you look at experience, i think very informative experience of the debt limit debate in august of 2011, that both confidence and markets remain pretty sanguine up to pretty close to the point where it looked like there was actually a chance tat debt limit would not be raised. and then, of course, there was a pretty sharp shock particularly to confidence about the time of the -- you know, of the final debates so it's not unusual to see markets being complacent. of course, there's -- from the market point of view
's potentially on the market, if we don't make a deal in washington. >> scott, let me ask you again how you want to allocate capital then in that environment. i know george young is with us again, joining the conversation. i want to ask you the same question. go ahead, scott. how are you investing right now? >> maria, i think the best way forward is the way it's worked since the bottom of the market in 2009. risk assets are where it's at. the fed is very supportive. the consumer is back and engaged. housing is getting better. the fiscal cliff is actually constructive from the standpoint it causes people to come together and compromise because going over the cliff while we may do it for a short time period is not beneficial to anybody. it hurts everybody. >> so risk assets being, what, technology? what does that mean, technology? >> not necessarily. we would stay with dividend payers. we would also dip our toe into europe into some very high-quality, multicountry stocks there. mostly on consumer discretionary stocks as well. >> george, we haven't forgotten you yet. scott, i have a question for yo
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4